Brene Brown

Yabbering

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Toph: And then when I was nine, I ran away again. I know I shouldn’t complain, my parents gave me everything that I ever asked for. But they never gave me the one thing that I really wanted. Their love. You know what I mean?

I have a tendency to overshare. It was the most pronounced when I drank. Through the haze of alcohol drinking buddies and even acquaintances became “soul mates”. We were “destined to meet” and obviously had “a real connection” because after a few drinks we were pouring our hearts (and our personal business) out.

I am an empathetic listener and love psychoanalyzing people, so I have a way of getting people to open up to me. Of course, I always opened up about myself too. To an alarming degree at times. Then, the next time Sober Me (with a less than perfect memory of what we talked about) met the recipient of my confessions, I would be embarrassed and worried about how much I’d revealed. My new “friend” would be baffled by what appeared to be an about face on my part. I, on the other hand, would pretty much be ready to bolt.

I know why I did it. I told my personal stories to anyone who would listen, just because I needed approval and love so badly. I needed self-acceptance so much that I wanted someone who heard my stories to tell me that I was still a good person, not broken, or if I was indeed broken, say that I was made the more beautiful for it.

I keep the telling of my personal stories in check now, revealing them to only trusted friends. The reason why I share anything now has also changed. It’s no longer because I desperately seek approval or proof of worth, and is instead to offer understanding and compassion.

“Our stories are not meant for everyone. Hearing them is a privilege, and we should always ask ourselves this before we share: “Who has earned the right to hear my story?” If we have one or two people in our lives who can sit with us and hold space for our shame stories, and love us for our strengths and struggles, we are incredibly lucky. If we have a friend, or small group of friends, or family who embraces our imperfections, vulnerabilities, and power, and fills us with a sense of belonging, we are incredibly lucky.” ~ Brene Brown

~*~

This is Post X, in the A to Z Blogging Challenge 2015. My 26 posts are inspired by the quotes from Avatar: The Last Airbender and The Legend of Korra, two Emmy award-winning animated television series created and produced by Michael Dante DiMartino and Bryan Konietzko. The setting for both series is an Asian-influenced world of martial arts and elemental manipulation. The shows drew on elements from East Asian, South Asian, and Western culture, and (aside from the kick-ass story lines, beautifully developed characters and exceptional storyboards) are where I found a wealth of inspiration and perspective on my own life.

The rest of my A to Z 2015 posts can be found here.

It’s Not You, It’s Me

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At some point in our dating history we have all heard or said that statement, or at least one of the following:

“Where I am in my life right now makes it’s better for me to be on my own.”

“My insecurities will play off your insecurities and vice versa. We will never work out.”

“I don’t have all my ducks in a row and you deserve to be with someone who does.”

“I’m just out of a relationship and I need some time to myself.”

“I need to focus on me right now.”

“I’m too busy with projects / career / family to be in a relationship.”

“The timing is all wrong.”

“I don’t mind hanging out with you but I don’t want to date you.”

“I’m not interested in pursuing a relationship with you.”

“I just don’t see you that way.”

“I just don’t feel ‘IT’.”

The thing is, these are all valid statements, even if the sentiment is not the whole truth. Sometimes, we find more sensitive and caring ways to say: “Hell no! You’re a trainwreck. I’m outta here!” And sometimes that is actually the kind thing to do. Some people are not ready for the truth and even if they hear it, the bearer of the news is deemed an insensitive jerk anyway. That’s just par for the course.

Wouldn’t you rather be with someone who you share sparks with? Where both of you WANT to be with each other. And I’m telling you, when you know, you know. When you really want to be with someone and someone really wants to be with you, you will BOTH find a way. And nothing will stop you. Not fear, not judgement, not doubt, not timing, not ducks.

I know it’s a shame to waste your effort if the feelings are not mutual. And unrequited love always hurts. But don’t let that get to you. There is no rule that says you should be compatible with everyone. And chances are, if you really ask yourself why you want to be with that person and even more importantly, if you should be in a relationship right now, you’ll realize that you have some homework to do.

“We cultivate love when we allow our most vulnerable and powerful selves to be deeply seen and known, and when we honor the spiritual connection that grows from that offering with trust, respect, kindness and affection.

Love is not something we give or get; it is something that we nurture and grow, a connection that can only be cultivated between two people when it exists within each one of them – we can only love others as much as we love ourselves.

Shame, blame, disrespect, betrayal, and the withholding of affection damage the roots from which love grows. Love can only survive these injuries if they are acknowledged, healed and rare.” ~ Brene Brown

It is totally understandable to feel bummed when a relationship doesn’t go the way you want. Happens to me too. I get upset because when the recipient of my affection does not fight for the relationship, I feel like I’m the one who’s not worth it. The reality is though, that most times it really doesn’t even have anything to do with me, and it’s a ton of other factors at play too. This doesn’t always make me feel any better though. It’s nice to be fought for. Except when the person is someone I don’t want anymore of course. 😉 Sigh, humans, we’re never satisfied.

That unworthiness feeling: For me, the root cause of the feeling usually has nothing to do with my current situation. It’s because of situations which happened when I was really young which left me feeling unworthy, unloved, and unimportant. In my present, when a relationship regresses rather than progresses I am reminded of that time when I was young and all those feelings come back. I have to talk to myself to put things into perspective and understand that each situation is different. It’s difficult but I try.

It is always disappointing when you can’t further a romantic relationship but how about trying to look at it a different way: Making a true connection with someone is very rare and when you hit it off with someone immediately, it is probably a friendship you are meant to have, even if it doesn’t turn into a romantic one. Give it some time and when you are ready, reach out from a place of friendship. You never know, you may have another best friend in the making there.

And we all could do with more of those. 🙂

Does that happen to you, Mr. Wind-Up Bird?

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All of us need to feel a sense of love and belonging. We’re hard-wired to want to be connected to others – that’s what gives meaning and purpose to our lives. (Brené Brown)

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A few days ago in my human development class we were talking about what drives our need for human connection, which led me to thinking about why those of us in recovery attend meetings. According to Gerald May, meaning comes to us through our relationships in life. He says, the three facets of human spiritual longing are the desire for belonging and union, the desire for loving and the desire for just being.

Even though we seek these three we are constantly frustrated because at the same time, usually out of habit, we protect ourselves against being rejected, or being found wanting, or not measuring up. We hesitate to open up completely and allow ourselves to be truly vulnerable. We have a false perception that to express any vulnerability is a sign of weakness. We hold back because of this ‘perfection culture’, fearing rejection or a sense of shame.

But we don’t have to hold back. We connect by mutual understanding and truth in life’s experiences.

Whether it makes you smile or cringe, a truth spoken is a healing thing.”(Jennifer DeLucy)

Our most fundamental sense of well-being is derived from the conscious experience of belonging. Relatedness is essential to survival. This is the underlying reason why we attend meetings or visit each other’s blogs on the sober blogging network.

We do it to connect with others who can identify with our experiences and who we can learn from.

“We are all wonderful, beautiful wrecks. That’s what connects us–that we’re all broken, all beautifully imperfect.” (Emilio Estevez)

Our feelings are our great connectors. Experiences and expressions of our feelings about those experiences allow us to connect and remember that we are not alone in this.

“Can I be honest with you, Mr. Wind-Up Bird? I mean, really, really, really honest? Sometimes I get sooo scared! I’ll wake up in the middle of the night all alone, hundreds of miles away from anybody, and it’s pitch dark, and I have absolutely no idea what’s going to happen to me in the future, and I get so scared I want to scream. Does that happen to you, Mr. Wind-Up Bird? When it happens, I try to remind myself that I am connected to others—other things and other people. I work as hard as I can to list their names in my head. On that list, of course, is you, Mr. Wind-Up Bird. And the alley, and the well, and the persimmon tree, and that kind of thing. And the wigs that I’ve made here with my own hands. And the little bits and pieces I remember about the boy. All these little things (though you’re not just another one of those little things, Mr. Wind-Up Bird, but anyhow…) help me to come back “here” little by little.” 

Haruki Murakami, The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle

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Phoenix